typeface

Bodo’s and Bodon’ts

I am working on my raw text piece for my Studio Problems in Typography course, and for one of the posters I am planning on using Bodoni as the main typeface. However, I am trying to figure out a typeface that will work well, yet contrast the main text. I have been doing some research and came across some do’s and don’ts with the use of typography on designshack.net in an article titled, 5 More Typography Do’s and Don’ts Everyone Should Know. There were several interesting statements regarding the use of typography; however, in this case, I was looking to figure out the thought process of choosing another typeface that would contrast Bodoni. Much of this information I am aware of, but the way the author explained the reasoning as to why a designer should not do something was interesting because he provided an explanation of what the designer is able to do instead. Here is one of the do’s and don’ts that I will take note of from the article:

Don’t: Mix fonts that are too similar 

  • An example would be, Times new Roman and Garamond. These typefaces are two very similar serifs that do not have enough contrast. 

Do: Use Different Font Styles

  • An example of this would be Helvetica with Garamond (instead of Times New Roman) because these typefaces contrast immensely.

**If you do not want the type to contrast, just simply use the same typeface for everything, maybe even just a different weight or size from the same family. 

The author did mention that there is a time when we are allowed to BREAK THE RULES! As long as the designer knows what he or she is doing, it may work. For example, the author chose to pair up Futura Headline and Helvetica in the body text. This worked well together because even though they are both modern san serifs, there is still a high contrast with the size and the weight of the fonts.

 

Image

I found this little cheat sheet through google images when I was researching typefaces that contrast Bodoni (This may help me solve my problem). This diagram is a bit dated but still works great. The 1 means that the typefaces are compatible, 2 means the two fonts could work well together if done properly, and 3 means that they will clash.